iEast SoundStream Wireless Cloud DLNA Airplay Music Receiver Review

Veetop Wireless Cloud DLNA Airplay Music Receiver Review Main

Image copyright belongs to iEast

 

The iEast SoundStream Wireless Cloud DLNA Airplay Music Receiver was kindly provided to me by Veetop free of charge in exchange for a fair and unbiased review on Amazon.co.uk. No additional compensation was given in exchange for posting this article on my blog.

The iEast SoundStream Wireless Cloud DLNA Airplay Music Receiver is available in the UK from Veetop Fulfilled by Amazon.co.uk at a cost of £59.99 with free P&P. At the time of writing the iEast SoundStream Wireless Cloud DLNA Airplay Music Receiver does not appear to be available on Amazon.com. (Prices correct at time of posting).

 

To enlarge an image and view its description, please click on the image.

 

PACKAGING & CONTENTS.

The Wireless audio receiver is packaged within a sturdy, good quality retail style card box bearing product images, information, specifications and a contents list.

 

Within the box the receiver is located at the top within a black padded tray and underneath can be found the following accessories…

3.5mm male to 3.5mm male round audio cable.
3.5mm male to 2 RCA male round audio cable.
A remote control. (Requires 2xAA batteries not included).
An English instruction manual that is illustrated in colour.


A USB wall power adaptor.
USB A to Micro B cable & USB A wall plug adaptor.

 

MEASUREMENTS.

The audio receiver measures 101.18mm long (including the WiFi aerial protruding from the rear), 68.13mm wide at its greatest point and 22.33mm deep (including the silicone feet on the underside, but not the WiFi aerial). When the WiFi aerial is raised the total depth of the device is 59.38mm.

 

It should be noted that the WiFi aerial can only be tilted left or right, it does not move forwards or backwards. There are ports on the rear and right edges and plugging anything into these ports will obviously add to the width and length. To minimise the footprint of the receiver consider replacing the cables with flat cables as they are much easier to conceal.

 

SPECIFICATIONS.

Compatibility – Windows, Mac, iOS, Android (with an official App on the Play and iTunes store).
WiFi – B/G/N
WiFi Antenna – 2db


Audio Format – APE, FLAC, WAV, Apple Lossless (ALAC), MP3: CBR/VBR 32kbps – 320kbps, AAC: AAC-LC, HE-AAC v2, WMA 48KHz/16bit – 192KHz/24bit.
Sample Rate – 24bit, 192Khz.
SNR – 112DB
DAC – ESS9023
Power Supply – DC5V 1000mA (while writing this review up I have had the device plugged into a USB 2.0 port allowing me to refer to it if needed and this port has a max output of 500mA)


LAN – 10/100Mbps
MicroSD – Up to 32GB (no further information provided, tested using Sandisk class 10 Ultra cards which work fine).

 

THE APP.

The App required to operate the device is called “iEast Play” and is available for both the Apple and Android stores. The App is thankfully very small and takes up just over 10MB of space on your mobile device.

 

The functions available on offer are as follows…

Search
Favourites
My Music – This lists all of the music accessible to your tablet located either on the tablet or your shared network access. From within this section you can playback by individual songs, by artist or by album.
Pandora – Internet radio.
TuneIn – Internet radio.
iHeartRadio – Internet radio.
Spotify – Music streaming service.

 

Looking at the iEast Play site additional services that are compatible are as follows…
Apple music, Deezer, qobuz, Google music, Tidal, Napster, Soundcloud, YouTube, Rdio. The site also implies that Chromecast support will also soon be added as well.

The last device I reviewed like this was the Muzo Cobblestone and while that was a rather impressive little device (other than the fact it looked like an air fresher disguised as a plastic pebble) but it did have a problem in the form of the App which was clearly aimed at the Chinese market. The iEast Play App however, is clearly a very western affair, while nothing fancy to look at it is clear, concise and easy to use.

Perhaps the most interesting feature within the App is the ability to operate multiple audio receivers within the App. They can be grouped together for synchronised playback or operated entirely independently of each other. At first this may only appear to be an attractive feature in a commercial environment but if you’re having a party couple a few of these up with your main HiFi and the others with some computer speakers or Bluetooth speakers and you can have seamless audio throughout the house.

For the purposes of my review a Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1″ tablet running Android 4.1.3 was used. The App is actually designed for use with a phone and on a 10.1″ screen some of the graphics (especially on the WiFi WPS setup screen) are rather ugly but everything else worked perfectly fine.

 

USE WITHOUT THE APP.

The audio receiver can be used entirely independently of any mobile devices thanks to the inclusion of a MicroSD port, remote control and line in port.

At first I have to admit that I simply expected the remote only to serve as a means of controlling the receiver when using a MicroSD card or with a device connected via Aux in. In truth, it will control the receiver in any mode, allowing you to control the volume, pause, play and skip tracks without the need to use your mobile device which will help to save the battery life of your mobile device not having to activate the screen while playing your music.

 

The MicroSD slot is a curious feature and one that most people will likely rarely use. Given that the App is free and small in size it takes seconds to install so if friends come around and they want to play their music its easier just to download the App rather than transfer over their card. Thanks to the remote you can use the receiver even when your mobile device is on charge so again there is no need to transfer over your memory card.

Had the storage capacity been 128GB I could see that some might want to keep a card installed with their full music library if their mobile device capacity is insufficient to do so. However, beyond this reason I see little point of the cost involved with adding the feature.

The line in port, however is an excellent inclusion. When the audio receiver is connected to your HiFi it takes up a 3.5mm / RCA or optical port and this acts as a pass-through. This is not just of benefit for those with limited ports on their HiFi but it also acts as an analogue to digital converter and also makes the line in port potentially more accessible as well.

 

MAC / PC.

The audio receiver can also stream music wirelessly from your Windows / Mac desktop / laptop or even NAS to do this you will need to setup a DNLA sever and that is something you will have to use Google to find out how to do as it is not covered within the manual and is a reasonably lengthy process to explain.

This particular article [HERE] covers the basics.

 

WIRED SETUP.

– Install the app on your mobile device.
– Plug the USB cable into the rear of the receiver and connect to a power source (such as the wall plug adapter supplied or a USB PC port or your own multiport USB charger). There is a power button on the right side of the device, but as soon as it is plugged in it automatically switches on.
– Use the 3.5mm to 3.5mm or 3.5mm to 2 RCA cable to connect the receiver to your Hi-Fi or other audio device such as a TV, Amp, portable boom box, etc. (You can also use an optical connection but there is no cable provided).
– Use a network cable to connect your router to the receiver. I used an FTP Cat 6E cable, but a basic Cat5 cable should suffice. (It should be noted that none is supplied within the box).


– Load the iEast Play app and the receiver will be automatically detected, just select the detected device. By default it will show up as “SoundStream” followed by a series of numbers and letters. (Each receiver will have a unique identifier after “SoundStream”.
– You will then be presented with a device list where you can change the name of the receiver(s), select which receiver to play music through, assign receivers to groups and adjust the default volume.
– Simply press the back icon in the top left of the screen and you are ready to start playing music.

 

WIRELESS SETUP.

– Install the app on your mobile device.
– Plug the USB cable into the rear of the receiver and connect to a power source (such as the wall plug adapter supplied or a USB PC port or your own multiport USB charger). There is a power button on the right side of the device, but as soon as it is plugged in it automatically switches on.
– Use the 3.5mm to 3.5mm or 3.5mm to 2 RCA cable to connect the receiver to your Hi-Fi or other audio device such as a TV, Amp, portable boom box, etc. (You can also use an optical connection but there is no cable provided).
– Load the app and press the “+” icon in the to left to start the WiFi installation process.
– When the App prompts you too, press the WPS button on the receiver and then follow the on screen instructions on your mobile device.


– You will then be presented with a device list where you can change the name of the receiver(s), select which receiver to play music through and adjust the default volume.
– Simply press the back icon in the top left of the screen and you are ready to start playing music.

Sadly, if your router lacks WPS, there is no information of help either within the manual or on the iEast Play site.

 

REVIEW.

Firstly the range, I have the receiver setup at a distance of 5m from my router and the line of sight is obstructed by a double thick brick wall that is uninsulated, but it does have 20-25mm of plaster slapped directly on each side (it’s an old house). In use with a Wireless G router the device works fine and in comparison my tablet has a 4/5 bar reception.

 

On a 20Mb connection, uploading a 2.3GB file to YouTube, someone using Facebook messaging on a phone and someone else browsing the net on a desktop has no effect on audio playback from the tablet to the receiver. When the router is under heavy load (two people playing online games) 320kbps tracks infrequently stutter very briefly*, but this was not noted with 235kbps tracks.

*If anything this is likely due to either my aging Note 10.1” 2012 or an even older Wireless G router, a more up to date AC router or higher end tablet may resolve this issue.

Audio playback quality through the receiver with either a wireless or a wired connection is identical. In the past, I used an official Samsung dock with a 3.5mm output to connect my tablet to my Hi-Fi, comparing the audio quality of this setup to the audio quality of the receiver is to my ears at least identical.

Beyond this there isn’t a vast amount to say, the device simply … works.

 

A quick note regarding my setup. To power the device I used an Anker USB > Micro B cable connected to an Anker 40w 5 port wall charger. The Audio cable used to connect the receiver to my HiFi is a 10+ year old IXOS 3.5mm to 2 RCA cable that cost me about £15.

 

Thank you for taking the time to read this review, I hope it has been helpful to you. If you have any questions or comments regarding this review, please post a comment below and I will do my best to answer them.

iEast is a registered trademark of iEast.io

Copyright © 2014-2016 EunoiaReviews. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any part of this site including images and video files is strictly forbidden without prior written consent.

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