AFENDO® 16000mAh Dual USB 2.1A/1A External Battery Review

AFENDO 16000mAh Dual USB 2.1A 1A External Battery Charger 3

 

The AFENDO® 16000mAh Dual USB 2.1A/1A External Battery was kindly provided to me by AFENDO Europe free of charge in exchange for a fair and unbiased review on Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com. No additional compensation was given in exchange for posting this article on my blog.

The AFENDO® 16000mAh Dual USB 2.1A/1A External Battery is available in the UK from AFENDO Europe Fulfilled by Amazon.co.uk in either white at a cost of £15.99 or black at a cost of £9.99 both with free P&P for Amazon Prime members. In the US the AFENDO power bank is available from AFENDO Fulfilled by Amazon.com in either white at a cost of $29.99 or black at a cost of $25.99 both with free P&P. (Prices correct at time of posting).

 

To enlarge an image and view its description, please click on the image.

 

CONTENTS.

The AFENDO 16000mAh Portable Charger comes supplied in a plain brown cardboard box with a separate wrap around card sleeve bearing product illustrations and information. Inside the box the power bank rests in a clear plastic insert and underneath you will find the following accessories…

 

– A velvet effect draw string protective storage pouch.
– An above average quality round USB A to Micro B charging cable.
– A rather small but thick illustrated instruction booklet offering instructions in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Chinese. (There’s 6 pages per language and the font is on the small side).

 

MEASUREMENTS.

The following measurements of the power bank are taken with a digital calliper and are accurate to within 0.1%.

 

Length = 144.5mm
Width = 65.28mm
Depth = 22.35mm (at its greatest point)
Weight = 310g

 

THE DEVICE.

The AFENDO 16000mAh Portable Charger is a reasonably well made device constructed from 4 separate sections of plastic. The main body is made from two pieces of finely textured ABS plastic (that sadly has a bit of a notable seam on the join) and the two end caps are made from a high gloss piano black plastic.

On one end the following information is printed in silver lettering…

“Model: AFDPBRF160
Capacity:1600mAh
Input: DC5.0-2.0A
Ouput1: DC5.0-2.1A
Output2: DC5.0-1.0A”

Along with symbols for CE, FCC and RoHS certification and symbols noting correct disposal procedure.

 

At the opposite end there are two USB A output ports stacked on top of each other only 1.92mm apart, the top labelled “Output1 2.1A” and the bottom “Output2 1.0A”. Why on earth they are placed in this manner is beyond me as side by side, they could have been separated further.

 

Simultaneous use with two basic cables is not a problem, however the cable supplied is actually of reasonable quality and coupled with an equal quality Anker cable the plastic moulded connectors touch and slightly push each other apart. Over time and with frequent use such a situation isn’t going to bode well for the ports to the point I would probably not want to use both ports at once… not a great start.

On the front of the power bank located centrally is a branding logo in silver lettering “AFENDO, High Capacity and Smart”. In the top right corner there are four tiny LED indicators. Each one of these indicators depicts a 25% charge of the internal battery and when nearly empty the final LED flashes to warn you.

On the right edge towards the top there is a USB Micro B input (charging port) although sadly there is only one (more expensive large power banks have multiple inputs to charge them quicker). Just below this is a 3.3mm x 11.5mm power button that sits flush with the side of the chassis.

When a device is connected to the power bank it automatically beings charging it (you do not need to press the power button to start charging and pressing it when a device is charging will not stop the charge). If you, however remove that device that is being charged from the connect cable and connect another device without removing the cable you will need to tap the power button to begin charging the newly connected device.

 

At any time, whether a device is charging or not you can tap the power button and the LED indicators will display the current charge level of the power bank for a brief time.

As mentioned previously the supplied cable isn’t the usual basic affair and it is actually comparably to that of some Anker charging cables I bought that cost in the region of £1.50 a pop. Likewise the supplied velvet effect slip case, while basic (unpadded) is rather well made, it is however only a means of protecting from dust while in storage or scratches when on the move.

 

TESTING RESULTS.

Usually when testing power banks I test their capacity using a [[ASIN:B00S4FHKMY DROK® Mini USB Current Voltage Charger Detector Multimeter Power Capacity 0-99999mAh; 0-30.00W; DC 0.00-3.00A; DC 3.50-13.0V Ampmeter Voltmeter Multi-in-1; OLED Mobile Testing Power Monitor with Screen Rotation Function; Power-off Storage Function; Over- and Under-voltage Alarm Function]].

The power bank was first obviously left to charge overnight till 100% full. (All charge testing was conducted using the 2.1A port).

 

The first device up for charging was a Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1″. The Note 10.1” has a capacity of 7000mAh and was already 61% charged. The tablet was switched on, WiFi was on but everything else was off including the screen. Initial readings were 5.03v, 2.313w, 0.46A* and the tablet battery indicator had a red cross through it.

*Sadly this is a problem with this particular tablet when using the Drok multimeter it’s not the fault of the power bank that it only outputs 0.46A.

After 21 minutes the tablet was charged 3% (5.04v, 0.46A, 2.318w).
After 41 minutes the tablet was charged 5% (5.02v, 0.46A, 2.309w).
After 1 hour and 55 minutes the tablet was charged 14% (5.01v, 0.46A, 2.304w).
After 2 hours and 16 minutes the tablet was charged 16% (5.09v, 0.46A, 2.341w).
After 3 hours and 4 minutes the tablet was charged 22% (5.04v, 0.46A, 2.318w).
After 3 hours and 52 minutes the tablet was charged 28% (5.09v, 0.46A, 2.341w).
After 4 hours and 52 minutes the tablet was charged 35% (5.02v, 0.46A, 2.309w).
After 5 hours and 18 minutes the tablet was charged 37% (5.09v, 0.46A, 2.341w).
The test was then stopped at this point.

The total output of the power bank while charging the Note 10.1” was 2678.8mAh + 53.3mAh used by the multimeter. (Total estimated consumption, thus far 2732.1mAh).

The second test was again with the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1″ which this time had a starting charge of 76%. Initial readings were 5.02v, 0.46A, 2.309w. It should be noted that at the start of the second test only 3 of the 4 indicator lights were lit indicating that at least 25% of the capacity had been consumed. Given that the output used thus far is well below 3000mAh this is not a good sign.

After 31 minutes the tablet was charged 3% (5.05v, 0.46A, 2.323w).
After 1 hour and 39 minutes the tablet was charged 11% (5.03v, 0.46A, 2.313w).
After 1 hour and 58 minutes the tablet was charged 14% (5.07v, 0.46A, 2.332w).
After 2 hours and 35 minutes the tablet was charged 18% (5.04v, 0.46A, 2.318w).
After 2 hours and 44 minutes the tablet was charged 19% (5.04v, 0.46A, 2.318w).
The test was then stopped at this point.

The total output of the power bank while charging the Note 10.1” was 1374.2mAh + 26.6mAh used by the multimeter. (Total estimated consumption, thus far 4132.9mAh).

The third test was again with the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1″ that had a starting charge of 57%. Initial readings were 5.05v, 0.46A, 2.228w. Unlike previous tests the tablet was in use during this test and so the mAh readings from the multimeter were used rather than the charge from the tablet.

After 12 minutes the tablet was charged 87mAh (5.06v, 0.46A, 2.327w).
After 25 minutes the tablet was charged 189mAh (5.04v, 0.46A, 2.318w).
After 2 hours and 24 minutes the tablet was charged 1173mAh (5.07v, 0.46A, 2.332w).
The test was then stopped at this point.

The total output of the power bank while charging the Note 10.1” was 1173mAh + 20.5mAh used by the multimeter. (Total estimated consumption, thus far 5326.4mAh).

The fourth test was conducted while charging a Motorola Moto G 2nd Gen. The Moto G which has a capacity of 2070mAh and was already 74% charged. The phone was switched on, WiFi was on but everything else was off including the screen. Initial readings were 5.00v, 0.93A, 4.659w.

After 26 minutes the phone was charged 19% (5.06v, 0.31A, 1.628w).
After 52 minutes the phone was charged 26% and was fully charged.

The total output of the power bank while charging the Moto G was 543.4mAh + 8.6mAh consumed by the multimeter. (Total estimated consumption, thus far 5878.4mAh).

For the fifth test it was back to the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1″ which had a 93% charge at the beginning of the test. Initial readings were 5.04v, 0.46A, 2.318w. The tablet was in use during this test and so the mAh readings from the multimeter were used rather than the charge from the tablet.

After 32 minutes the tablet was charged 243mAh (5.07v, 0.46A, 2.332w).
After 52 minutes the tablet was charged 402mAh (5.06v, 0.46A, 2.327w).
After 1 hour and 37 minutes the tablet was charged 698mAh (5.12v, 0.30A, 1.537w).
The test was then stopped at this point.

The total output of the power bank while charging the Note 10.1″ was 698mAh + 16.2mAh consumed by the multimeter. (Total estimated consumption, thus far 6592.6mAh).

For the sixth test the Note 10.1″ was charged once again, this time the starting charge of the tablet was 78%. Initial readings were 5.06v, 0.46A, 2.327w.

After 27 minutes the tablet was charged 3% (5.03v, 0.46A, 2.313w).
After 1 hour and 17 minutes the tablet was charged 9% (5.07v, 0.46A, 2.327w).
After 1 hour and 21 minutes the tablet was charged 10% (5.07v, 0.46A, 2.332w).
The test was then stopped at this point.

The total output of the power bank while charging the Note 10.1″ was 793.1mAh + 13.5mAh consumed by the multimeter. (Total estimated consumption, thus far 7399.2mAh).

For the seventh test the Note 10.1″ was charged once again, this time the starting charge of the tablet was 91%. Initial readings were 5.03v, 0.46A, 2.313w. The tablet was in use during this test and so the mAh readings from the multimeter were used rather than the charge from the tablet.

After 20 minutes the tablet was charged 154mA (5.05v, 0.46A, 2.323w).
After 1 hour and 16 minutes the tablet was charged 588mAh (5.04v, 0.42A, 2.171w).
After 1 hour and 33 minutes the tablet was charged 702mAh (5.07v, 0.34A, 1.723w).
After 1 hour and 56 minutes the tablet was charged 783mAh (5.07v, 0.34A, 1.723w).
The test was then stopped at this point.

The total output of the power bank while charging the Note 10.1″ was 783mAh + 19.3mAh consumed by the multimeter. (Total estimated consumption, thus far 8201.5mAh).

For the eighth test the Moto G 2nd Gen was charged, this time the starting charge of the phone was 79%. Initial readings were 5.02v, 0.94A, 4.778w.

After 8 minutes the phone was charged 6% (4.99v, 0.64A, 3.957w).
After 20 minutes the phone was charged 11% (5.10v, 0.41A, 2.197w).
After 30 minutes the phone was charged 15% (5.07v, 0.29A, 1.650w).
After 39 minutes the phone was charged 17% (5.05v, 0.21A, 1.679w).
The test was then stopped at this point.

The total output of the power bank while charging the Note Moto G was 355.3mAh + 6.5mAh consumed by the multimeter. (Total estimated consumption, thus far 8563.3mAh).

For the ninth test the Note 10.1″ was charged once again, this time the starting charge of the tablet was 79%. Initial readings were 5.04v, 0.46A, 2.318w.

After 23 minutes the tablet was charged 3% (5.04v, 0.46A, 2.318w).
After 49 minutes the tablet was charged 7% (5.04v, 0.46A, 2.318w).
After 1 hour and 3 minutes the tablet was charged 8% (5.03v, 0.46A, 2.313w).
After 1 hour and 38 minutes the tablet was charged 13% (5.07v, 0.46A, 2.332w).
After 2 hours and 10 minutes the tablet was charged 17% (5.03v, 0.46A, 2.313w).
The test was then stopped at this point.

The total output of the power bank while charging the Note 10.1″ was 1226mAh + 21.7mAh consumed by the multimeter. (Total estimated consumption, thus far 9811mAh).

For the tenth test the Note 10.1″ was charged once again, this time the starting charge of the tablet was 78%. Initial readings were 5.01v, 0.46A, 2.304w. The tablet was in use during this test and so the mAh readings from the multimeter were used rather than the charge from the tablet.

After 32 minutes the tablet was charged 249mAh (5.04v, 0.46A, 2.318w).
After 1 hour and 5 minutes the tablet was charged 522mAh (5.07v, 0.46A, 2.332w).
At some point between 1 hour and 5 minutes and 2 hours 30 minutes the battery had fully depleted with a final charge of 810mAh.

The total output of the power bank while charging the Note 10.1″ was 810mAh + and estimated 15mAh consumed by the multimeter.

The total output of the power bank from fully charged to fully dead during one somewhat slightly non scientific test that was not conducted in a controlled environment with results that should not be taken too seriously and are as such just a guide gave an output reading of 10636 mAh.

With the power bank having a capacity of 16000mAh this indicates an efficiency of 66.475%. The average efficiency of these devices is about 80% and more premium devices offing an efficiency of around 90% with few managing more than 93%. A reading of 66.475% is by far the worst of some 20+ power banks I have reviewed and I suspect it to be incorrect as if it were the device would have become notably warm during use and it did not.

If it were a 15000mAH battery efficiency would have been 70.90%
If it were a 14000mAh battery efficiency would have been 75.97%
If it were a 13000mAh battery efficiency would have been 81.81%

Based on this I somewhat suspect the actual capacity of the AFENDO 16000mAh power bank to be in the region of 13000mAh to 14000mAh.

In reality, there is probably a +/- 2% to 3% margin of error in my results, however the testing method conducted is the same used for some 20+ power banks that I have reviewed. The average result is between 78% to 84% and none have ever shown an efficiency of below 73%, hence the reason I suspect the capacity is overstated.

A couple of additional points
– After over 5 hours of constant use the power bank never even became slightly warm to the touch.
– Charging the AFENDO 16000mAh power bank on a laptop USB 2.0 port takes approximately 11 hours 15 minutes to fully charge. (For larger power banks a dual input for faster charging really is required).

 

Thank you for taking the time to read this review, I hope it has been helpful to you. If you have any questions or comments regarding this review, please post a comment below and I will do my best to answer them.

AFENDO is a registered trademark of iafendo.com

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